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Stuff you might consider reading September 4, 2007

Posted by dorigo in astronomy, Blogroll, computers, internet, news, physics, science.
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Today I was not in the mood of physics blogging, and I rather found solace in a few quite interesting posts and threads. Much more entertaining than the recent debate on sexism anyway… Here is a small list:

Comments

1. Kea - September 4, 2007

Thanks for the link. Actually, I found the sexism comment thread quite entertaining, but it cannot hope to match Sir Woit and Count Lubos today, which had me rolling on the floor.

2. dorigo - September 5, 2007

Correct on both counts. The debate on sexism had me amused too in fact, but it took too much of my time… And the issues generated by the Chalmers piece and its review are also quite entertaining!

Cheers,
T.

3. Chris Oakley - September 5, 2007

Kea,

As a Brit, I feel it necessary to point out that one never says “Sir Woit”. Maybe “Sir Peter” or “Sir Peter Woit” but never “Sir Woit”! I have seen Lubos make this error a number of times (although not with Peter’s name – even if Peter did get a knighthood I don’t think that LM would acknowledge it), but as you seem not to be as wilfully ignorant (who is?) I feel that I am not necessarily wasting my time in pointing this out.

4. dorigo - September 5, 2007

Not at all a waste of time if you ask me, I am always all ears when one teaches me better English.

Cheers,
T.

5. Thomas Larsson - September 5, 2007

Chris, isn’t knighthood only for British citizens? Thus not Peter.

6. Chris Oakley - September 5, 2007

Hi Thomas,

I am no expert on this & it may well be that the U.S. does not permit its citizens to take such foreign titles anyway. Maybe PW might classify as a Jedi Knight: Master Woit, apprentice of Master Callan, whose self-appointed task is to bring balance to The Force following the higher-dimensional depredations of the Sith Lord Distler and his apprentice Motl.

7. DB - September 5, 2007

Thomas,
Knighthoods are not restricted to British citizens. For example, Sir
Bob Geldof is an Irish citizen and he holds a honorary knighthood. Another Irish citizen – who holds dual American citizenship – is the billionaire Sir Anthony O’Reilly. His is a full knighthood. Under the Irish Constitution, Irish citizens who wish to take up a full knighthood have to have Cabinet approval – which O’Reilly obtained. Alan Greenspan, former Federal Reserve chairman and a US citizen, was recently elevated to an honorary knighthood.
Sir Peter has an authentic, almost Harry-Potter-esque ring to it. His blog is usually a model of pained restraint, although this, as is obvious from Sir Bob’s elevation, is not a pre-requisite.🙂
The Motl-ey Fool is in no need of supplementary elevation, regal or other, he floats comfortably on a bed of his own hot air.

8. Kea - September 5, 2007

Hi Chris

Yes, I was aware of this convention, but reluctant to apply it to Peter.

9. Fred - September 6, 2007

Alan Greenspan?! For what??

AG: “Throw a few pence in the pot this way and that. Stir. Whatya say, prez, Wall Street needs a new dress. These numbers will go perfectly with the garters holding up your stocks, I mean socks.”
Prez: “I don’t do laundry but me and my friends could use a larger sized belt. It’s strange but our pants keep falling down even though our waist gets bigger and bigger. Yer doin’ a hell of a job Brownie, I mean Greenie.”
AG: “Aww, don’t worry ’bout dat. The Reds are gonna call me Sir one day. See ya!”
Prez: “Wait! Wait! The Tories are comin’ to dinner. What color tie goes with the silverware, the stars or the stripes?”

10. Bee - September 6, 2007

Thanks for the link🙂


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